Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Finding Your Female Ancestors at Hayden Library




Dear Friends,

I've scheduled a three-month genealogy series to delve into the extraordinary lives of our female ancestors, in particular, those born during the early 20th century when the women's suffrage movement led to the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution. The workshop will last about an hour with informal sharing, so bring your bagged lunch as we have the room until 12:00 p.m.

FINDING YOUR FEMALE ANCESTORS AT HAYDEN LIBRARY
Saturday, Jan 11 at 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Where Were Your Female Ancestors Celebrating the Vote: 100 Years of Women’s Suffrage

Saturday, Feb 8 at 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Finding American Women’s Voices through the Centuries: Letters, Diaries, Journals, Newspapers, and Court Records

Saturday, March 14 at 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Nineteenth Century Women Settlers Confront the Far West

"The Seneca Falls Convention framed a national discussion about women's rights in America and marked the beginning of a massive civil rights movement that would span the next 70 years. The right to vote was seen as the first step to change the traditional and unjust systems that existed. Women worked for equal rights." 

You might want to get your hands on a good book or two for "light" reading. I'd recommend The Ladies of Seneca Falls: The Birth of the Woman's Rights Movement (Studies in the Life of Women). You could goggle using the terms: "books on women's suffrage" or just read websites. 

Merry Christmas, and I hope will to see you soon.

Your friend,
Kim Morgan


Monday, December 2, 2019

Will your family keepsakes end up like this??



My doggers and I enjoy taking walks along our Spokane County road. While I too often carry a bag to pick up trash, I did once find a $20 bill. Score!


Imagine my horror, dismay and tears to find this lying with other trash spilling out of a black plastic bag in the gravel. 

Of course you're thinking, "well this won't happen to MY stuff!" Or will it???

Giving precious heirlooms to an unappreciative son or niece might just guarantee your memento or photo to end up at best in the Goodwill or at worst, alongside the road. 

Friday, November 29, 2019

Best Genealogy Periodical: Family Tree Magazine


If I were asked to recommend my candidate for best (meaning most useful) genealogy magazine, Family Tree Magazine would be my choice, hands down. 

Family Tree Magazine is published six issues per year and subscription costs $25 (less for a digital subscription). Each issue is chock-full of useful ideas and resources. Couple times a year they have lists of "75 Best Genealogy Website for ____" Could be U.S. research, could be state-by-state resources, etc. Each issue has Collectible State Guides that easily pull out from the center of the magazine. The Dec 2019 issue featured New York and North Dakota. There are dozens of other regular features always worth my time to read.

What are your kids getting you for Christmas?????? Wouldn't you like this better than a sweater??

Call 888-403-9002 to subscribe or send an email to familytree@emailcustomerservice.com


Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Happy Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving from the EWGS Blog

 Thanksgiving Card from my Aunt Carrie
to my grandmother Anna Hansen

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

Free Tutorial Videos........ Helpful learning on your schedule.


We're all up for "free," right? I've taught for years in my classes that "if it's free, take two!" 

Would you like to know about 450 online FREE video lessons on how to better use FamilySearch and Ancestry and how to do genealogy better in general?


Provo sits about thirty miles south of Salt Lake City and the Family History Library. Provo is the home of BYU, Brigham Young University. There is a Family History Library on this campus and it's a real rival to its "big brother" up in Salt Lake. 

Here's how to check this out: (1) click to www.youtube.com;  (2) in the top search bar type in BYU Family History Library; (3) the requested "channel" should come right up; (4) click to subscribe to this "channel" and you'll be notified when new videos are posted.

So let's see. With 450 online tutorials and 365 days in a year, and if you watched one video per day, in 18 months think how smart you'd be! And how confident! 

Saturday, November 23, 2019

Save the Chancery Building? Yes or No?


There is a huge decision looming regarding the rehabilitation or demolishing of the Catholic Chancery building next door to Our Lady of Lourdes Cathedral. Do we care what happens?

I certainly do! That building has stood for over 100 years and housed the diocese for 53 years. Originally, the Diocesan Archives were held in the basement. Famed architect Kirtland Cutter designed the building in 1910 and it housed various businesses until 1966 when the Catholic diocese purchased the building (their old building being in the path of I-90). 

Cowles Real Estate Company owns the building and stated in an article in The Spokesman Review last August that "with the age of the building, many of the systems are nearing or past the end of their useful life, including the roof, plumbing, electrical, elevator and HVAC." 

Here's what I think: Quoting from the website www.whitehousehistory.org:

President Harry S. Truman also had the White House renovated between 1948 and 1952. The White House interior was gutted in an extensive renovation. The original exterior walls remained standing while the interiors were removed and reinstalled within a skeleton of steel structural beams on a new concrete foundation

If, back in 1950, that magnificent structure was totally gutted and updated, why cannot that be done to one of the few really great historic buildings remaining in Spokane???

It was suggested to me that anybody who cares might want to write a letter to Betsy Cowles, c/o The Spokesman Review, 999 W. Riverside, Spokane WA  99201, and explain your thoughts and feelings regarding that 100 year old and most beautiful building.

Tuesday, November 19, 2019

A Picture Worth 1000 Words



No need to say anything about this image I found on Facebook. One picture says it all.